Category Archives: Schools

Call for articles – points of view…

!cid_3174513477_958480    To all my dedicated readers,

I thought about letting this blog go since I retired and then I decided to include retired teachers to the mix. New to retired teachers all have something to say and want to know what is happening nationwide in public and private education.There is much to be said about our educational system and much might be changed for the good if more people shared their great ideas, views, and great or maybe not so great experiences. Someone somewhere will be listening. So this is a shout out to all of my teaching and retired teaching extended family for experience and/or research backed posts to add to this blog. To this date my blog has had 7,878 hits and 344 followers and I haven’t posted an entry in two years. It’s time to get back on track.  If you’d like to be considered for site publication, you may choose to include your real name or use a pseudonym. There is interest in what you all have to say and bottom line is – children need our help inside and outside the classroom! Margaret Mead said, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”  You can message me with any questions you might have. Hoping to hear from you soon!

1990's 11!

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Seth Meyers shreds Detroit’s shady school system: You have to pay your teachers for teaching

Thanks for speaking up for the Detroit teachers Seth!!  Hmm… Could this be the beginning of looking into more things that school systems nationwide need to be looked into for?

Source: Seth Meyers shreds Detroit’s shady school system: You have to pay your teachers for teaching

Physical assault on teachers?

Not just in Kent! My goodness! This has been going on forever! When I was in fifth grade I remember a very mean boy punching my teacher in the face. Working as a teacher, the first time a child threw furniture in my classroom was in 1997. No one knows what teachers’ work involves and until politicians and others step inside the classroom and spend time with teachers no one ever will. Then again, those spending time in classrooms might not even admit to what they see. We might call this “feigned ignorance” or “an easier way to blame teachers for all of the ills in society and education”.  It’s time to wake up and admit that all of us have a great deal of work to do! Parents, guardians, teachers, politicians, and others. Not only are society and our political system collapsing – education is too! So – is teaching all bad? Heavens no! I wouldn’t trade a moment of my experiences – good or bad – for anything! Every experience in life is a lesson learned. I am not blaming! I realize that all any of us know is what we’ve been taught to a given point in our lives. It takes an effort to change experience for all. While we can’t change the past, we can do something about the present and future. It takes courage to speak up and out. Will you?

http://q13fox.com/2016/05/10/teachers-union-says-more-elementary-school-kids-are-physically-assaulting-teachers/

What about the child?

In 1918, a special commission of the National Education Association presented a set of goals on the “purposes of school”.  The list included:

  • providing the child with a sense of ethics
  • teaching the child responsibility for his/her own health
  • teaching the child sensitivity toward the responsibilities of citizenship
  • mastery of the three “R’s”
  • teaching the child to use leisure time well
  • encouraging worthy human relationships with family and friends
  • teaching the child to make a living

We have come to teach a new generation of students and the goals these days seem to focus on teacher quality and offering great schools for students to learn in. While the Common Core Standards stress highest student achievement for all I have to wonder – wouldn’t the goals presented in 1918 be practical for our students today and if so – why are we not paying more attention to them?

Thoughts anyone?

Transforming society and lives through music

cello players    Looking at the work of Jose Antonio Abreu in Venezuela we see how the arts can transform society by bridging the gap between rich and poor while increasing intellectual and emotional capacities in children. From an original group of 11 impoverished children Abreu built the more than 300,000 student El Sistema, a nationwide organization of more than 100 youth orchestras made up of students from poor and middle-class neighborhoods. As Abreu states: “It is evident that music has to be recognized as an element of socialization, as an agent of social development in the highest sense, because it transmits the highest values: solidarity, harmony, mutual compassion.”

Is it time to implement a proactive approach to our societal dilemmas by providing all our children means for a better way?  Some think so as is evidenced by El Sistema groups forming around the world.  For information on the USA group go to http://elsistemausa.org/.

SREB News: Online Teachers Share Strategies with ShortTakes

K-12 teachers – does classroom teaching have you feeling down?  Think online!  K-12 virtual schools are springing up across the nation.  If you have a flair for technology and think you’d enjoy teaching from home, it may be time to investigate virtual schools.

SREB News: Online Teachers Share Strategies with ShortTakes.

Remembering Dr. King, Dad, and life lessons from both.

MLK

He sat at the edge of the sofa, glazed eyes fixed on the TV screen, tears streaming down his face. My brother and I watched silently with our father as the body of Martin Luther King was pulled by two mules on a mule cart. Thousands of people marched in tandem. My father wept, not ashamed to cry in front of us. “Why did they kill him?” we asked.

“Come close,” Dad said. “Never judge anyone by the color of their skin. There are good and bad people in every group,” he said. “Look to the person, and not the group they belong to. Consider everyone as an individual – an equal – remember that.”

08-06-2009 11;44;31AM

This would be one of the many life lessons I learned from my Italian father. Like King, Dad sought fairness for all in a time when it was not a popular thing to do. Similar to Dr. King’s life cut short at the hand of an assassin, Dad’s life was cut short in a car accident. I would only realize the meaningful extent of both of their legacy’s through their deaths.

Today, I can see my father on the sofa and the images of King’s funeral procession as if it was yesterday. I take comfort knowing the lessons I learned from both that year are handed down to each new group of students that enter my classroom.

The significance of today – the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech and the historical second inauguration of President Obama will be meaningful to some though not all. We have come a long way but the road is long and we still have a way to go.

For the 50th anniversary of the “I Have a Dream” speech illustrated…

http://abclocal.go.com/wls/video?id=8961639&pid=8961633

How to keep talented teachers from leaving

A must read for anyone interested in preserving the integrity and vitality of the teaching profession.

How to keep talented teachers from leaving.

Flu season and the classroom

With flu season in full swing now issneezing a great time to search for those books on “germs” taking residency on your classroom bookshelves. Presenting tips to avoid catching the flu to your students through literature is a valuable lesson this time of year.  Follow-up your readings with posting pictured tips on a classroom wall.

Preventing the spread?  What teachers can do:

1. Inform your students – knowledge is power.

2. Teach students the importance of proper hand washing – lather top and bottom of hands with soap and rinse thoroughly.

3. Teach students to cough inside of the arm or elbow.    Encourage use of tissues by having several boxes available at different classroom locations.

4. Provide hand sanitizer and encourage students to use it when entering or leaving the classroom.

5. Clean desks and doorknobs daily as well as any classroom items often touched by others.

6. Inform classroom parents of the steps you are taking in the classroom.  These tips can help them at home as well.

clean-hands_zps58626f13

Is it a cold or the flu?

Characteristic

Flu

Cold

Chest infection/cough Common.  Can become severe. Common.  Mild to moderate.
Fever Usually high (102°-104°) May last 3-4 days. Rare except in young children.
General aches and pains Usual. Can be severe. Mild.
Headache Common. Rare.
Sneezing/red, watery, itchy   eyes Rare. Usual.
Sore throat Occasional. Usual.
Stuffy nose Occasional. Usual.
Tiredness Severe. Mild.
Primary season Winter. Late August – April.
Duration Up to a month. 7 – 10 days.
Adapted/modified from:Balch, P. A., & Balch, J. F.   (2000). Prescription for nutritional healing   (3rd ed.). New York, New York: Avery.

children

Remember – a healthy classroom is a happy and productive classroom!

For other ideas see http://www.teachervision.fen.com/disease-prevention/resource/62164.html

For more information see http://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season-2013-2014.htm

To America from a Teacher

writing_letter      This is a beautifully written letter – one I’m sure many of us would have loved to have written but just haven’t gotten around to.  Thank you for sharing lisamyers.org!

To America from a Teacher.