Tag Archives: parenting

Today’s Child – Maslow and safety needs

Second on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs is safety. Children thrive on structure, stability, and freedom from fear.  Knowing what comes next in their daily routine makes them feel safe and secure.

  • Set clear boundaries and learn how to say “no”.
  • Maintain a calm, cozy home.
  • Keep activities outside of school spaced and simple.
  • Be sure your child is supervised and not left alone.
  • Check that purchased products for your child meet national safety standards.
  • Children love to explore. Check your home often to eliminate items that could be potentially hazardous.

For more information on preventive measures, check the World Report for Child Injury Prevention at…

http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/child/injury/world_report/final_data_10.pdf?ua=1

 

Advertisements

Today’s child – Maslow at work or did we forget?

In 1954 psychologist Abraham Maslow developed his theory of Hierarchy of Needs. His hierarchy is based on the assumption that human beings have basic needs. These needs expound upon each other over time until self-actualization occurs. We’ve come a long way since this theory was developed. Though time and circumstance see our world a different place, the basic tenants of human nature and needs stay the same. Needs being met allude to learning taking place and meaningful life. Since learning and views on life begin in the home and continue in school, what better gift can parents and teachers give children than to truly understand and strive to meet their basic needs?  Maslow said humans have physiological, safety, belongingness and love, esteem, and self-actualization needs. These needs begin with infancy and continue through adulthood. Childhood then, is a critical time for all.

What about current childhood experiences? When Maslow stated his theory, most families had two parent households with one parent working and one at home. The steady rise of one-parent families and extended working hours has placed a strain on the amount of time available to meet the needs of children. Add to this increasing demands society places on all to achieve and it’s easy to see how the most important things in life may fall by the wayside.

That said, this will be the first in a series of posts based on Maslow’s Hierarchy, which is just as valid today as when first theorized. I hope you will add ideas and real world examples as levels are published. Children are our future and the most important adult task we have is to make sure children are nurtured substantively to encourage life-long learning that leads to meaningful lives worth living. Until tomorrow…

Up and the Hierarchy of Needs/tiffanyx93’s channel

How can we improve early education?

My father was a self-employed painting contractor.  As a child I observed his love of work and determination to grow intellectually even though he left school after the eighth grade – in his day, an accepted thing to do.

dad - youth     Leaving school did not diminish his motivation to learn.  I can still see him sitting on the sofa with book in hand learning all he could about whatever piqued his interest.  Dad always told me, “The more you can do in life, the more independently successful you will be.”  Dad’s passing did not diminish my motivation to learn.  He modeled well the life skills needed to survive in a competitive work world.

I reflected on Dad’s lessons as I viewed the following video “How can we improve early education?”

Listen as D. Quinn Mills, Consultant; Past Professor Emeritus, Harvard Business School and expert on the differences between Asian and Western leadership styles shares his views on how we can improve early education by instilling in children motivation to learn.

http://bigthink.com/videos/how-can-we-improve-early-education

Colin Powell: Kids need structure

A great talk!  Helps us learn that students are more than a grade on a piece of paper.  Just look at what a straight “C” student can do with the right structure!