Category Archives: parenting

Social Skills Instruction – Needed Now More Than Ever…

multicultural students

In schools across the nation, violence has become a part of “daily life”. While it may be that we hear of it more often in secondary schools – violence is prevalent in all schools beginning in the elementary years.

When schools, administrators, and teachers are placed under microscopes to create readers and great test takers at all costs, developmental practices of teaching the whole child vanish from the curriculum. Pushdown curriculums frustrate learners who need to learn along a progressive continuum in order to establish self-worth, “I can” attitudes, and ultimate learning success.

We can’t assume that teaching reading and math for most of the day will lead to well-rounded learners. In order for children to thrive, they need to learn the fundamentals of being functional in society as well. This used to begin at an early age with social studies instruction, yet social studies instruction has virtually vanished from the curriculum. No time.

Children do not automatically learn how to behave. They learn by what they see and know to any given point in their lives. It takes everyone to provide appropriate behavior learning conditions and modeling. If it’s not happening in the home it needs to happen in the classroom. Unfortunately, teachers are so restricted by what and how they have to teach, they run the risk of poor evaluations if they step outside of the “box” they have been placed in.

We can’t blame children or teachers for what is happening in schools today. Perhaps it’s time to take a serious look at the curriculum being provided and offer a better path to higher student achievement through positive social interaction instruction which teaches children that morals, character, and compassion for others will lead them to being caring, successful, and productive members of society.

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Today’s Child – Maslow and safety needs

Second on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs is safety. Children thrive on structure, stability, and freedom from fear.  Knowing what comes next in their daily routine makes them feel safe and secure.

  • Set clear boundaries and learn how to say “no”.
  • Maintain a calm, cozy home.
  • Keep activities outside of school spaced and simple.
  • Be sure your child is supervised and not left alone.
  • Check that purchased products for your child meet national safety standards.
  • Children love to explore. Check your home often to eliminate items that could be potentially hazardous.

For more information on preventive measures, check the World Report for Child Injury Prevention at…

http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/child/injury/world_report/final_data_10.pdf?ua=1